Watches Sales: The largest collection of watches and clocks on the web

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Maintaining the accuracy of my watch?

Heat and cold have an effect on the accuracy of a quartz watch. Watches which are fitted with quartz oscillating crystals are designed to function optimally under room temperature. A temperature of 100 Fahrenheit will throw the timing off by 1 second a day, as well as one of 32 Fahrenheit.

However, for a mechanical watch to differ by 1 second a day or less is not a very big factor since we do not expect the same accuracy as a quartz watch. Advances in metallurgy have also very well controlled the effects of temperature on watch accuracy. This is why some self-winding watches are subjected to extremes in temperature to be certified as chronometer standard.

A watch should also not be exposed to extreme temperature. This affects the viscosity of the oil that lubricates the movement, and thereby affects the movement's accuracy.

Wearing my watch?

A watch should always be worn on the outside of the wrist (not inside), with the dial up and the crown down (nearer the hand than the elbow). Most watches are regulated based on the right handed person, so this means the watch is worn on the left wrist, with the components in proper position. Any other position may yield some differences in accuracy unless otherwise regulated at the desired position. This is true only for mechanical watches.

It is also not proper to wear a watch too loosely as it may loosen the individual links of the bracelet and clasp when constantly exposed to shock. A watch worn too tight on the other hand may deform the bracelet, apart from giving an uncomfortable fit.

Nearly all mechanical watches are equipped with anti-shock devices that protect the watch's balance-staff pivots-parts of the watch movement most vulnerable to damage from impact such as those encountered from tennis or golf. Nonetheless, there is a small chance that a hard knock could damage not only the balance but also the rotor axle. So deciding whether or not to wear your mechanical watch when playing sports is a matter of risk assessment.

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Watches Sales

The largest collection of
watches and clocks on the web

Watches Sales: The largest collection of watches and clocks on the web